Why Do Mother Cats Attack Their Older Kittens? (Insecure)

All kittens are adorable, but when they are older, they become more adorable. However, older kittens are attacked by their mother cat.

Why do mother cats attack their older kittens?

Mother cats attack their older kittens because the mother cat feels insecure. The kittens are bigger and stronger than the mother cat. So, the mother cat feels insecure and attacks the kittens.

Keep reading to know more about why mother cats attack their older kittens.

Why do mother cats attack their older kittens?

The mother cat’s instinct to protect her kittens

The mother cat’s instinct to protect her kittens is the most likely reason for this behavior. The mother may feel that the older kittens threaten the younger ones, or she may simply be trying to keep them from leaving her side.

In either case, it’s important to give the mother and her kitten plenty of space and to avoid handling them too much. If you’re concerned about the mother’s behavior, speak with your veterinarian.

The mother cat’s fear of her older kittens

Many mother cats attack their older kittens out of fear. For example, the mother cat may feel that her older kittens are a threat to her younger ones, and she may attack them to protect the younger kittens.

In some cases, the mother cat may feel overwhelmed and need some time to adjust to her new role as a mother. However, if you have a mother cat attacking her older kittens, it is important to take action immediately to prevent serious injury or even death.

The mother cat needs to assert her dominance.

The mother cat’s need to assert dominance is the most likely reason she would attack her older kittens. This behavior is seen more often in households with more than one cat. The mother cat may feel threatened by the other cats and take it out on her kittens. She may also be trying to protect her kittens from the other cats.

The mother cat’s territorial instinct

Many mother cats become aggressive towards their older kittens around six to eight weeks old. This is because the mother’s instinct to protect her territory kicks in. She now sees her kittens as potential competitors for food and space, so she drives them away.

You can do a few things to stop a mother cat from attacking her older kittens. One is to keep the mother and kittens apart until the kittens are at least 12 weeks old. Another is to neuter the mother cat, reducing her territorial instinct. Finally, you can try socializing the mother cat with her kittens from a young age so that she becomes used to them and doesn’t see them as a threat.

The mother cat’s aggression towards her older kittens

There are several theories about why mother cats might attack their older kittens. The most likely explanation is that the mother is overwhelmed and trying to reduce the number of mouths she has to feed. This is especially common in cases where the litter is large or the food supply is low.

Another possibility is that the mother is acting on instinct, trying to protect her kittens from predators by getting rid of the weaker litter members. But, of course, there are also instances where the mother is acting out of instinct and has no malicious intent towards her offspring.

Whatever the reason, it’s important to remember that this behavior is not necessarily indicative of a lack of maternal instincts on the part of the mother cat.

The mother cat’s desire to be the only cat in her litter

The mother cat’s desire to be the only cat in her litter is the most likely reason she would attack her older kittens. When the kittens are born, the mother cat is instinctively driven to protect them and keep them safe.

However, as they grow older and become more independent, she may feel threatened by their presence. Sometimes, the mother cat may even view her older kittens as competition for food and resources. If the mother cat feels that her kittens threaten her survival, she may attack them to drive them away.

The mother cat’s jealousy of her older kittens

As the mother cat’s jealousy of her older kittens subsides, she will become more accepting of them and even allow them to nurse.

The mother cat’s instinct to kill her older kittens

As shocking as it may sound, sometimes mother cats kill their older kittens. There are several reasons why this may happen, but most of the time, it’s due to the mother’s instinct. When a mother cat feels her kittens are in danger, she may attack them to protect them.

Sometimes, the mother cat may be too overwhelmed to care for her kittens and may resort to killing them to preserve her energy. Unfortunately, little can often be done to prevent this from happening, as it is usually instinctual for the mother cat.

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Conclusion

Mother cats attack their older kittens for 2 main reasons. The first reason is that they are protecting their young. The second reason is that they are hungry. So, in this blog, we have discussed these reasons in detail.

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